Toxy - Hackable Http Proxy To Simulate Server Failure Scenarios And Network Conditions

Thursday, November 5, 2015


Toxy is a fully programmatic and hackable HTTP proxy to simulate server failure scenarios and unexpected network conditions , built for node.js / io.js .

It was mainly designed for fuzzing/evil testing purposes, when toxy becomes particularly useful to cover fault tolerance and resiliency capabilities of a system, especially in disruption-tolerant networks and service-oriented architectures, where toxy may act as MitM proxy among services.

toxy allows you to plug in poisons, optionally filtered by rules, which essentially can intercept and alter the HTTP flow as you need, performing multiple evil actions in the middle of that process, such as limiting the bandwidth, delaying TCP packets, injecting network jitter latency or replying with a custom error or status code. It operates only at L7 (application level).

toxy can be fluently used programmatically or via HTTP API . It was built on top of rocky , a full-featured middleware-oriented HTTP proxy, and it's also pluggable in connect / express as standard middleware.

Requires node.js +0.12 or io.js +1.6

Features
  • Full-featured HTTP/S proxy (backed by rocky and http-proxy )
  • Hackable and elegant programmatic API (inspired on connect/express)
  • Admin HTTP API for external management and dynamic configuration
  • Featured built-in router with nested configuration
  • Hierarchical and composable poisoning with rule based filtering
  • Hierarchical middleware layer (both global and route scopes)
  • Easily augmentable via middleware (based on connect/express middleware)
  • Supports both incoming and outgoing traffic poisoning
  • Built-in poisons (bandwidth, error, abort, latency, slow read...)
  • Rule-based poisoning (probabilistic, HTTP method, headers, body...)
  • Supports third-party poisons and rules
  • Built-in balancer and traffic interceptor via middleware
  • Inherits API and features from rocky
  • Compatible with connect/express (and most of their middleware)
  • Able to run as standalone HTTP proxy

Introduction

Why toxy?
There're some other similar solutions like toxy in the market, but most of them do not provide a proper programmatic control and usually are not easy to hack, configure or are directly closed to extensibility.
Furthermore, the majority of the those solutions only operates at TCP L3 level stack instead of providing high-level abstractions to cover common requirements in the specific domain and nature of the HTTP L7 protocol, like toxy tries to provide
toxy brings a powerful hackable and extensible solution with a convenient abstraction, but without losing a proper low-level interface capabilities to deal with HTTP protocol primitives easily.
toxy was designed based on the rules of composition, simplicity and extensibility. Via its built-in hierarchical domain specific middleware layer you can easily augment toxy features to your own needs.

Concepts
toxy introduces two directives: poisons and rules.
Poisons are the specific logic which infects an incoming or outgoing HTTP transaction (e.g: injecting a latency, replying with an error). One HTTP transaction can be poisoned by one or multiple poisons, and those poisons can be also configured to infect both global or route level traffic.
Rules are a kind of match validation filters that inspects an HTTP request/response in order to determine, given a certain rules, if the HTTP transaction should be poisioned or not (e.g: if headers matches, query params, method, body...). Rules can be reused and applied to both incoming and outgoing traffic flows, including different scopes: global, route or poison level.

How it works
↓  ( Incoming request )  ↓
↓          |||           ↓
↓    +-------------+     ↓
↓    | Toxy Router |     ↓ -> Match the incoming request
↓    +-------------+     ↓
↓          |||           ↓
↓ +--------------------+ ↓
↓ |   Incoming phase   | ↓ -> The proxy receives the request from the client
↓ |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~| ↓
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |  |  Exec Rules  |  | ↓ -> Apply configured rules for the incoming request
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |        |||         | ↓
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |  | Exec Poisons |  | ↓ -> If all rules passed, then poison the HTTP flow
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~+ ↓
↓        /      \        ↓
↓        \      /        ↓
↓ +--------------------+ ↓
↓ |  HTTP dispatcher   | ↓ -> Forward the HTTP traffic to the target server, either poisoned or not
↓ +--------------------+ ↓
↓        /      \        ↓
↓        \      /        ↓
↓ +--------------------+ ↓
↓ |   Outgoing phase   | ↓ -> Receives response from target server
↓ |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~| ↓
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |  |  Exec Rules  |  | ↓ -> Apply configured rules for the outgoing request
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |        |||         | ↓
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ |  | Exec Poisons |  | ↓ -> If all rules passed, then poison the HTTP flow before send it to the client
↓ |  ----------------  | ↓
↓ +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~+ ↓
↓          |||           ↓
↓ ( Send to the client ) ↓ -> Finally, send the request to the client, either poisoned or not

Usage

Installation
npm install toxy

Examples
See examples directory for more use cases.
var toxy = require('toxy')
var poisons = toxy.poisons
var rules = toxy.rules

// Create a new toxy proxy
var proxy = toxy()

// Default server to forward incoming traffic
proxy
  .forward('http://httpbin.org')

// Register global poisons and rules
proxy
  .poison(poisons.latency({ jitter: 500 }))
  .rule(rules.probability(25))

// Register multiple routes
proxy
  .get('/download/*')
  .forward('http://files.myserver.net')
  .poison(poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 }))
  .withRule(rules.headers({'Authorization': /^Bearer (.*)$/i }))

// Infect outgoing traffic only (after the server replied properly)
proxy
  .get('/image/*')
  .outgoingPoison(poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 512 }))
  .withRule(rules.method('GET'))
  .withRule(rules.timeThreshold({ duration: 1000, threshold: 1000 * 10 }))
  .withRule(rules.responseStatus({ range: [ 200, 400 ] }))

proxy
  .all('/api/*')
  .poison(poisons.rateLimit({ limit: 10, threshold: 1000 }))
  .withRule(rules.method(['POST', 'PUT', 'DELETE']))
  // And use a different more permissive poison for GET requests
  .poison(poisons.rateLimit({ limit: 50, threshold: 1000 }))
  .withRule(rules.method('GET'))

// Handle the rest of the traffic
proxy
  .all('/*')
  .poison(poisons.slowClose({ delay: 1000 }))
  .poison(poisons.slowRead({ bps: 128 }))
  .withRule(rules.probability(50))

proxy.listen(3000)
console.log('Server listening on port:', 3000)
console.log('Test it:', 'http://localhost:3000/image/jpeg')

Poisons
Poisons host specific logic which intercepts and mutates, wraps, modify and/or cancel an HTTP transaction in the proxy server. Poisons can be applied to incoming or outgoing, or even both traffic flows.
Poisons can be composed and reused for different HTTP scenarios. They are executed in FIFO order and asynchronously.

Poisoning scopes
toxy has a hierarchical design based on two different scopes: global and route .
Global scope points to all the incoming HTTP traffic received by the proxy server, regardless of the HTTP method or path.
Route scope points to any incoming traffic which matches with a specific HTTP verb and URI path.
Poisons can be plugged to both scopes, meaning you can operate with better accuracy and restrict the scope of the poisoning, for instance, you might wanna apply a bandwidth limit poisoning only to a certain routes, such as /download or /images .
See routes.js for a featured example.

Poisoning phases
Poisons can be plugged to incoming or outgoing traffic flows, or even both.
Incoming poisoning is applied when the traffic has been received by proxy but it has not been forwarded to the target server yet.
Outgoing poisoning refers to the traffic that has been forwarded to the target server and when proxy recieves the response from it, but that response has not been sent to the client yet.
This means, essentially, that you can plug in your poisons to infect the HTTP traffic before or after the request is forwarded to the target HTTP server or sent to the client.
This allows you apply a better and more accurated poisoning based on the request or server response. For instance, given the nature of some poisons, like inject error , you may want to enable it according to the target server response (e.g: some header is present or not).
See poison-phases.js for a featured example.

Built-in poisons

Latency
Name latency
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Infects the HTTP flow injecting a latency jitter in the response
Arguments :
  • options object
    • jitter number - Jitter value in miliseconds
    • max number - Random jitter maximum value
    • min number - Random jitter minimum value
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.latency({ jitter: 1000 }))
// Or alternatively using a random value
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.latency({ max: 1000, min: 100 }))

Inject response
Name inject
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server false (only as incoming poison)
Injects a custom response, intercepting the request before sending it to the target server. Useful to inject errors originated in the server.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • code number - Response HTTP status code. Default 500
    • headers object - Optional headers to send
    • body mixed - Optional body data to send. It can be a buffer or string
    • encoding string - Body encoding. Default to utf8
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.inject({
  code: 503,
  body: '{"error": "toxy injected error"}',
  headers: {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}
}))

Bandwidth
Name bandwidth
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Limits the amount of bytes sent over the network in outgoing HTTP traffic for a specific time frame.
This poison is basically an alias to throttle.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • bytes number - Amount of chunk of bytes to send. Default 1024
    • threshold number - Packets time frame in miliseconds. Default 1000
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bytes: 512 }))

Rate limit
Name rateLimit
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Limits the amount of requests received by the proxy in a specific threshold time frame. Designed to test API limits. Exposes typical X-RateLimit-* headers.
Note that this is very simple rate limit implementation, indeed limits are stored in-memory, therefore are completely volalite. There're a bunch of featured and consistent rate limiter implementations in npm that you can plug in as poison. You might be also interested in token bucket algorithm.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • limit number - Total amount of requests. Default to 10
    • threshold number - Limit time frame in miliseconds. Default to 1000
    • message string - Optional error message when limit is reached.
    • code number - HTTP status code when limit is reached. Default to 429 .
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.rateLimit({ limit: 5, threshold: 10 * 1000 }))

Slow read
Name rateLimit
Poisoning Phase incoming
Reaches the server true
Reads incoming payload data packets slowly. Only valid for non-GET request.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • chunk number - Packet chunk size in bytes. Default to 1024
    • threshold number - Limit threshold time frame in miliseconds. Default to 1000
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.slowRead({ chunk: 2048, threshold: 1000 }))

Slow open
Name: slowOpen
Name slowOpen
Poisoning Phase incoming
Reaches the server true
Delays the HTTP connection ready state.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • delay number - Delay connection in miliseconds. Default to 1000
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.slowOpen({ delay: 2000 }))

Slow close
Name slowClose
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Delays the HTTP connection close signal (EOF).
Arguments :
  • options object
    • delay number - Delay time in miliseconds. Default to 1000
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.slowClose({ delay: 2000 }))

Throttle
Name throttle
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Restricts the amount of packets sent over the network in a specific threshold time frame.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • chunk number - Packet chunk size in bytes. Default to 1024
    • delay object - Data chunk delay time frame in miliseconds. Default to 100
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.throttle({ chunk: 2048, threshold: 1000 }))

Abort connection
Name abort
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server false (only as incoming poison)
Aborts the TCP connection. From the low-level perspective, this will destroy the socket on the server, operating only at TCP level without sending any specific HTTP application level data.
Arguments :
  • options object
    • delay number - Aborts TCP connection after waiting the given miliseconds. Default to 0
    • next boolean - If true , the connection will be aborted if the target server takes more than the delay param time to reply. Default to false
    • error Error - Custom internal node.js error to use when destroying the socket. Default to null
// Basic connection abort
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.abort())
// Abort after a delay
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.abort(1000))
// In this case, the socket will be closed if
// the target server takes more than
// 2 seconds to respond
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.abort({ delay: 2000, next: true }))

Timeout
Name timout
Poisoning Phase incoming / outgoing
Reaches the server true
Defines a response timeout. Useful when forward to potentially slow servers.
Arguments :
  • miliseconds number - Timeout limit in miliseconds
toxy.poison(toxy.poisons.timeout(5000))

How to write poisons
Poisons are implemented as standalone middleware (like in connect/express).
Here's a simple example of a server latency poison:
var toxy = require('toxy')

function customLatency(delay) {
  /**
   * We name the function since toxy uses it as identifier to get/disable/remove it in the future
   */
  return function customLatency(req, res, next) {
    var timeout = setTimeout(clean, delay)
    req.once('close', onClose)

    function onClose() {
      clearTimeout(timeout)
      next('client connection closed')
    }

    function clean() {
      req.removeListener('close', onClose)
      next()
    }
  }
}

var proxy = toxy()

// Register and enable the poison
proxy
  .get('/foo')
  .poison(customLatency(2000))
You can optionally extend the build-in poisons with your own poisons:
toxy.addPoison(customLatency)

// Then you can use it as a built-in poison
proxy
  .get('/foo')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.customLatency)
For featured real example, take a look to the built-in poisons implementation.

Rules
Rules are simple validation filters which inspects an incoming or outgoing HTTP traffic in order to determine, given a certain rules (e.g: matches the method, headers, query params, body...), if the current HTTP transaction should be poisoned or not, based on the resolution value of the rule.
Rules are useful to compose, decouple and reuse logic among different scenarios of poisoning. Rules can be applied to global, route or even poison scope, and it also applies to both phases of poisoning .
Rules are executed in FIFO order. Their evaluation logic is equivalent to Array#every() in JavaScript: all the rules must pass in order to proceed with the poisoning.

Built-in rules

Probability
Name probability
Poison Phase incoming / outgoing
Enables the rule by a random probabilistic. Useful for random poisoning.
Arguments :
  • percentage number - Percentage of filtering. Default 50
var rule = toxy.rules.probability(85)
toxy.rule(rule)

Time threshold
Name timeThreshold
Poison Phase incoming / outgoing
Simple rule to enable poisons based on a specific time threshold and duration. For instance, you can enable a certain poisons during a specific amount of time (e.g: 1 second) within a time threshold (e.g: 1 minute).
Arguments :
  • options object
    • duration number - Enable time inverval in miliseconds. Default to 1000
    • threshold number - Time threshold in miliseconds to wait before re-enable the poisoning. Default to 10000
// Enable the poisoning only 100 miliseconds per each 10 seconds
proxy.rule(toxy.rules.timeThreshold(100))
// Enable poisoning during 1 second every minute
proxy.rule(toxy.rules.timeThreshold({ duration: 1000, period: 1000 * 60 }))

Method
Name method
Poison Phase incoming / outgoing
Filters by HTTP method.
Arguments :
  • method string|array - Method or methods to filter.
var method = toxy.rules.method(['GET', 'POST'])
toxy.rule(method)

Content Type
Filters by content type header. It should be present
Arguments :
  • value string|regexp - Header value to match.
var rule = toxy.rules.contentType('application/json')
toxy.rule(rule)

Headers
Name headers
Poison Phase incoming / outgoing
Filter by request headers.
Arguments :
  • headers object - Headers to match by key-value pair. value can be a string, regexp, boolean or function(headerValue, headerName) => boolean
var matchHeaders = {
  'content-type': /^application/\json/i,
  'server': true, // meaning it should be present,
  'accept': function (value, key) {
    return value.indexOf('text') !== -1
  }
}

var rule = toxy.rules.headers(matchHeaders)
toxy.rule(rule)

Response headers
Name responseHeaders
Poison Phase outgoing
Filter by response headers from target server. Same as headers rule, but evaluating the outgoing request.
Arguments :
  • headers object - Headers to match by key-value pair. value can be a string , regexp , boolean or function(headerValue, headerName) => boolean
var matchHeaders = {
  'content-type': /^application/\json/i,
  'server': true, // meaning it should be present,
  'accept': function (value, key) {
    return value.indexOf('text') !== -1
  }
}

var rule = toxy.rules.responseHeaders(matchHeaders)
toxy.rule(rule)

Body
Name body
Poison Phase incoming / outgoing
Match incoming body payload by a given string , regexp or custom filter function .
This rule is pretty simple, so for complex body matching (e.g: validating against a JSON schema) you should probably write your own rule.
Arguments :
  • match string|regexp|function - Body content to match
  • limit string - Optional. Body limit in human size. E.g: 5mb
  • encoding string - Body encoding. Default to utf8
  • length number - Body length. Default taken from Content-Length header
var rule = toxy.rules.body('"hello":"world"')
toxy.rule(rule)

// Or using a filter function returning a boolean
var rule = toxy.rules.body(function contains(body) {
  return body.indexOf('hello') !== -1
})
toxy.rule(rule)

Response body
Name responseBody
Poison Phase outgoing
Match outgoing body payload by a given string , regexp or custom filter function .
Arguments :
  • match string|regexp|function - Body content to match
  • encoding string - Body encoding. Default to utf8
  • length number - Body length. Default taken from Content-Length header
var rule = toxy.rules.responseBody('"hello":"world"')
toxy.rule(rule)

// Or using a filter function returning a boolean
var rule = toxy.rules.responseBody(function contains(body) {
  return body.indexOf('hello') !== -1
})
toxy.rule(rule)

Response status
Name responseStatus
Poison Phase outgoing
Evaluates the response status from the target server. Only applicable to outgoing poisons.
Arguments :
  • range array - Pair of status code range to match. Default [200, 300] .
  • lower number - Compare status as lower than operation. Default to null .
  • higher number - Compare status as higher than operation. Default to null .
  • value number - Status code to match using a strict equality comparison. Default null .
  • include array - Unordered list of status codes to match. Useful to specify custom status. Default null
// Strict evaluation of the status code
toxy.rule(toxy.rules.responseBody(200))
// Using a range of valid status
toxy.rule(toxy.rules.responseBody([200, 204]))
// Using relational comparison
toxy.rule(toxy.rules.responseBody({ higher: 199, lower: 400 }))
// Custom unordered status code to match
toxy.rule(toxy.rules.responseBody({ include: [200, 204, 400, 404] }))

Third-party rules
List of available third-party rules provided by the community. PR are welcome.
  • IP - Enable/disable poisons based on the client IP address (supports CIDR, subnets, ranges...).

How to write rules
Rules are simple middleware functions that resolve asyncronously with a boolean value to determine if a given HTTP transaction should be ignored when poisoning.
Your rule must resolve with a boolean param calling the next(err, shouldIgnore) function in the middleware, passing a true value if the rule has not matches and should not apply the poisoning, and therefore continuing with the next middleware stack.
Here's an example of a simple rule matching the HTTP method to determine if:
var toxy = require('toxy')

function customMethodRule(matchMethod) {
  /**
   * We name the function since it's used by toxy to identify the rule to get/disable/remove it in the future
   */
  return function customMethodRule(req, res, next) {
    var shouldIgnore = req.method !== matchMethod
    next(null, shouldIgnore)
  }
}

var proxy = toxy()

// Register and enable the rule
proxy
  .get('/foo')
  .rule(customMethodRule('GET'))
  .poison(/* ... */)
You can optionally extend the build-in rules with your own rules:
toxy.addRule(customMethodRule)

// Then you can use it as a built-in poison
proxy
  .get('/foo')
  .rules(toxy.rules.customMethodRule)
For featured real examples, take a look to the built-in rules implementation

Programmatic API
toxy API is completely built on top the rocky API . In other words, you can use any of the methods, features and middleware layer natively provided by rocky .

toxy([ options ])
Create a new toxy proxy.
For supported options , please see rocky documentation
var toxy = require('toxy')

toxy({ forward: 'http://server.net', timeout: 30000 })

toxy
  .get('/foo')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.latency(1000))
  .withRule(toxy.rules.contentType('json'))
  .forward('http://foo.server')

toxy
  .post('/bar')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 }))
  .withRule(toxy.rules.probability(50))
  .forward('http://bar.server')

toxy
  .post('/boo')
  .outgoingPoison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 }))
  .withRule(toxy.rules.method('GET'))
  .forward('http://boo.server')

toxy.all('/*')

toxy.listen(3000)

toxy#get(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for GET method.

toxy#post(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for POST method.

toxy#put(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for PUT method.

toxy#patch(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute

toxy#delete(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for DELETE method.

toxy#head(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for HEAD method.

toxy#all(path, [ middleware... ])
Return: ToxyRoute
Register a new route for any method.

toxy#poisons => Object
Exposes a map with the built-in poisons. Prototype alias to toxy.poisons

toxy#rules => Object
Exposes a map with the built-in poisons. Prototype alias to toxy.rules

toxy#forward(url)
Define a URL to forward the incoming traffic received by the proxy.

toxy#balance(urls)
Forward to multiple servers balancing among them.
For more information, see the rocky docs

toxy#replay(url)
Define a new replay server. You can call this method multiple times to define multiple replay servers.
For more information, see the rocky docs

toxy#use(middleware)
Plug in a custom middleware.
For more information, see the rocky docs .

toxy#useResponse(middleware)
Plug in a response outgoing traffic middleware.
For more information, see the rocky docs .

toxy#useReplay(middleware)
Plug in a replay traffic middleware.
For more information, see the rocky docs

toxy#requestBody(middleware)
Intercept incoming request body. Useful to modify it on the fly.
For more information, see the rocky docs

toxy#responseBody(middleware)
Intercept outgoing response body. Useful to modify it on the fly.
For more information, see the rocky docs

toxy#middleware()
Return a standard middleware to use with connect/express.

toxy#host(host)
Overwrite the Host header with a custom value. Similar to forwardHost option.

toxy#redirect(url)
Redirect traffic to the given URL.

toxy#findRoute(routeIdOrPath, [ method ])
Find a route by ID or path and method.

toxy#listen(port)
Starts the built-in HTTP server, listening on a specific TCP port.

toxy#close([ callback ])
Closes the HTTP server.

toxy#poison(poison)
Alias: usePoison , useIncomingPoison
Register a new poison to infect incoming traffic.

toxy#outgoingPoison(poison)
Alias: useOutgoingPoison , responsePoison
Register a new poison to infect outgoing traffic.

toxy#rule(rule)
Alias: useRule
Register a new rule.

toxy#withRule(rule)
Aliases: poisonRule , poisonFilter
Apply a new rule for the latest registered poison.

toxy#enable(poison)
Enable a poison by name identifier

toxy#disable(poison)
Disable a poison by name identifier

toxy#remove(poison)
Return: boolean
Remove poison by name identifier.

toxy#isEnabled(poison)
Return: boolean
Checks if a poison is enabled by name identifier.

toxy#disableAll()
Alias: disablePoisons
Disable all the registered poisons.

toxy#getPoison(name)
Return: Directive|null
Searchs and retrieves a registered poison in the stack by name identifier.

toxy#getIncomingPoison(name)
Return: Directive|null
Searchs and retrieves a registered incoming poison in the stack by name identifier.

toxy#getOutgoingPoison(name)
Return: Directive|null
Searchs and retrieves a registered outgoing poison in the stack by name identifier.

toxy#getPoisons()
Return: array<Directive>
Return an array of registered poisons.

toxy#getIncomingPoisons()
Return: array<Directive>
Return an array of registered incoming poisons.

toxy#getOutgoingPoisons()
Return: array<Directive>
Return an array of registered outgoing poisons.

toxy#flush()
Alias: flushPoisons
Remove all the registered poisons.

toxy#enableRule(rule)
Enable a rule by name identifier.

toxy#disableRule(rule)
Disable a rule by name identifier.

toxy#removeRule(rule)
Return: boolean
Remove a rule by name identifier.

toxy#disableRules()
Disable all the registered rules.

toxy#isRuleEnabled(rule)
Return: boolean
Checks if the given rule is enabled by name identifier.

toxy#getRule(rule)
Return: Directive|null
Searchs and retrieves a registered rule in the stack by name identifier.

toxy#getRules()
Return: array<Directive>
Returns and array with the registered rules wrapped as Directive .

toxy#flushRules()
Remove all the rules.

toxy.addPoison(name, fn)
Extend built-in poisons.

toxy.addRule(name, fn)
Extend built-in rules.

toxy.poisons => Object
Exposes a map with the built-in poisons.

toxy.rules => Object
Exposes a map with the built-in rules.

toxy.VERSION => String
Current toxy semantic version.

ToxyRoute
ToxyRoute exposes the same interface as Toxy global interface, it just adds some route level additional methods .
Further actions you perform againts the ToxyRoute API will only be applicable at route-level (nested). In other words: you already know the API.
This example will probably clarify possible doubts:
var toxy = require('toxy')
var proxy = toxy()

// Now using the global API
proxy
  .forward('http://server.net')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 }))
  .rule(toxy.rules.method('GET'))

// Now create a route
var route = proxy
  .get('/foo')
  .toPath('/bar') // Route-level API method
  .host('server.net') // Route-level API method
  .forward('http://new.server.net')

// Now using the ToxyRoute interface
route
  .poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 512 }))
  .rule(toxy.rules.contentType('json'))

Directive(middlewareFn)
A convenient wrapper internally used for poisons and rules.
Normally you don't need to know this interface, but for hacking purposes or more low-level actions might be useful.

Directive#enable()
Return: boolean

Directive#disable()
Return: boolean

Directive#isEnabled()
Return: boolean

Directive#rule(rule)
Alias: filter

Directive#handler()
Return: function(req, res, next)

HTTP API
The toxy HTTP API follows the JSON API conventions, including resource based hypermedia linking.

Usage
For a featured use case, see the admin server example.
const toxy = require('toxy')

// Create the toxy admin server
var admin = toxy.admin({ cors: true })
admin.listen(9000)

// Create the toxy proxy
var proxy = toxy()
proxy.listen(3000)

// Add the toxy instance to be managed by the admin server
admin.manage(proxy)

// Then configure the proxy
proxy
  .forward('http://my.target.net')

proxy
  .get('/slow')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 }))

// Handle the rest of the traffic
proxy
  .all('/*')
  .poison(toxy.poisons.bandwidth({ bps: 1024 * 5 }))

console.log('toxy proxy listening on port:', 3000)
console.log('toxy admin server listening on port:', 9000)
For more details about the admin programmatic API, see below .

Authorization
The HTTP API can be protected to unauthorized clients. Authorized clients must define the API key token via API-Key or Authorization HTTP headers.
To enable it, you should simple pass the following options to toxy admin server:
const toxy = require('toxy')

const opts = { apiKey: 's3cr3t' }
var admin = toxy.admin(opts)

admin.listen(9000)
console.log('protected toxy admin server listening on port:', 9000)

API
Hierarchy :
  • Servers - Managed toxy instances
    • Rules - Globally applied rules
    • Poisons - Globally applied poisons
      • Rules - Poison-specific rules
    • Routes - List of configured routes
      • Route - Object for each specific route
        • Rules - Route-level registered rules
        • Poisons - Route-level registered poisons
          • Rules - Route-level poison-specific rules

GET /

Servers

GET /servers

GET /servers/:id

Rules

GET /servers/:id/rules

POST /servers/:id/rules
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "method",
  "options": "GET"
}

DELETE /servers/:id/rules

GET /servers/:id/rules/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/rules/:id

Poisons

GET /servers/:id/poison

POST /servers/:id/poisons
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "latency",
  "phase": "outgoing",
  "options": { "jitter": 1000 }
}

DELETE /servers/:id/poisons

GET /servers/:id/poisons/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/poisons/:id

GET /servers/:id/poisons/:id/rules

POST /servers/:id/poisons/:id/rules
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "method",
  "options": "GET"
}

DELETE /servers/:id/poisons/:id/rules

GET /servers/:id/poisons/:id/rules/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/poisons/:id/rules/:id

Routes

GET /servers/:id/routes

POST /servers/:id/routes
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "path": "/foo", // Required
  "method": "GET", // use ALL for all the methods
  "forward": "http://my.server", // Optional custom forward server URL
}

DELETE /servers/:id/routes

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id

Route rules

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/rules

POST /servers/:id/routes/:id/rules
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "method",
  "options": "GET"
}

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/rules

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/rules/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/rules/:id

Route poisons

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons

POST /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "latency",
  "phase": "outgoing",
  "options": { "jitter": 1000 }
}

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id/rules

POST /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id/rules
Accepts: application/json
Example payload:
{
  "name": "method",
  "options": "GET"
}

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id/rules

GET /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id/rules/:id

DELETE /servers/:id/routes/:id/poisons/:id/rules/:id

Programmatic API
The built-in HTTP admin server also provides a simple interface open to extensibility and hacking purposes. For instance, you can plug in additional middleware to the admin server, or register new routes.

toxy.admin([ opts ])
Returns: Admin
Supported options :
  • apiKey string - Optional API key to protect the server
  • port number - Optional. TCP port to listen
  • cors boolean - Enable CORS for web browser access
  • middleware array<function> - Plug in additional middleware
  • ssl object - Node.js HTTPS server TLS options .

Admin#listen([ port, host ])
Start listening on the network.

Admin#manage(toxy)
Manage a toxy server instance.

Admin#find(toxy)
Find a toxy instance. Accepts toxy server ID or toxy instance.

Admin#remove(toxy)
Stop managing a toxy instance.

Admin#use(...middleware)
Register a middleware.

Admin#param(...middleware)
Register a param middleware.

Admin#get(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a GET route.

Admin#post(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a POST route.

Admin#put(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a PUT route.

Admin#delete(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a DELETE route.

Admin#patch(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a PATCH route.

Admin#all(path, [ ...middleware ])
Register a route accepting any HTTP method.

Admin#middleware(req, res, next)
Middleware to plug in with connect/express.

Admin#close(cb)
Stop the server.




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